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In Memory Of Pets Newsletter
December 2002


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December 2002 Newsletter

In Memory of Pets

 

All of us at In Memory Of Pets want to give our special blessings

to you and your loving families and friends during this upcoming Holiday Season.

May all find peace and comfort in yours

Hearts through loving memories.

 

 

This Month’s December Newsletter:

 

First Steps in Training your Puppy:

 

A puppy must be taught how to behave in a human environment,

where it is allowed to go in the house, and what it is allowed to do.

This training must commence as soon

as your puppy is introduced to the household,

and you must start as you mean to go on, never relaxing,

for every time you give a command which is ignored you have, in fact,

taught the puppy to be disobedient.

The time to begin training varies from breed to breed and puppy to puppy,

but can be any time after about six weeks,

providing the puppy proves attentive.

 

Your puppy should have its very own bed or box,

and it is useful to teach it to go there on command.

Point your finger at the bed and choose a constant command,

“Go to your basket” or “Get in your bed”.

This should be a firm, but with no hint of anger otherwise

the puppy will feel as if it is being chastised.

If necessary, lift the puppy and place it in the bed,

repeating the command, then reward with praise.

Last thing at night, make the reward a small biscuit or chewy.

Your puppy should treat its bed as a private retreat and

must enjoy going to it when told to do so.

This is a valuable lesson and may save a puppy from harm

when the command is given as a distraction from danger.

 

Decide which rooms are available to your puppy,

and teach it to stay out of the others.

Be sure to shut your puppy away on its own for periods each day

so that it does not resent being alone.

Start with a short period when the puppy is tired,

and settle it in its bed with toys and a treat.

Gradually lengthen the periods of temporary isolation,

and in this way you will avoid having a dog which whines and

barks whenever it is left.

 

 

Using the word “No”

 

The word “No” should be sued firmly and sternly every time your puppy

acts in an unacceptable manner.

This is an important command which will be used throughout the dog’s life and

must be taught correctly from the outset.  Never use “No” if there is a chance

that you will be disobeyed, and do not use it so often that there is a danger

of your  puppy becoming immune to the command.  “No” may be reinforced

by a reprovingly raised index finger or by slapping your hand

against your leg, or clapping the hands.

 

Young puppies naturally carry objects around in their mouths and

this behavior may be encouraged as it leads

naturally to the “retrieve” training given in later weeks.

Lot of lavish praise should be given for a good performance

as this helps to compensate in some measure

for the number of times the “NO” command has to be given.

Puppies vary immensely in temperament,

but most are content with praise consisting

of a short word and a pat, while others need

to be greatly fussed with and petted.

Try to avoid giving tidbits as rewards.

 

Play with your puppy, taking up various roles

in replace it missing pack-mates.

Puppies enjoy mock battles when you musts pretend to be another dog

of the same age, and “tag” when you must first chase your puppy and

then allow it to turn and chase you.

Playing builds up a unique relationship between you and your dog.

You must never allow your puppy to get over-excited, however,

or allow its playful bites and snaps be become too realistic.

If this situation starts to develop, use the “No” command, follow by praise and

a tactile reward when your puppy relaxes.

 

You may decide to allow your puppy to rest in one particular armchair, and

this can be given special washable slip cover or cushions,

which are changed when soiled.

 

Give your new puppy proper training and love and this love will be returned

tenfold and unconditionally.

 

 


Please Note:

As always your Veterinarian is the best source of information and
treatment for questions or problems that may exist.

If you have any suggestions or comments or would like to add to
our "Monthly Newsletter",


please e-mail:

Carole Miller
or
John Mingo

"Our Thank You To All"

WE want to thank all our volunteers and special folks who have shared their
open feelings in support and caring in responding to others in our "Guest Book"
and our "Message Board" and for the continued support for all that
In Memory Of Pets has to offer from our hearts..

Bless all who come to "In Memory Of Pets" in sharing loving feelings
for their beloved ones.

John, Carole and Staff



* Should you wish to make a contribution you may do so to:
In Memory of Pets
278 Cedar Road
Hershey, PA 17033
Attn: Kenneth L. Miller Secretary/Treasurer

*Or use on our online Secure site:

http://www.in-memory-of-pets.com/donations.asp
(Our"Thank You" page will give you a link for the information needed for sending
your free gifts to you from our hearts before
you leave the secure site.)

*Please Note: A Certificate of Appreciation is sent out with each donation.
When sending donations please let us know your correct name to be used on the certificate.
Stop by and visit Ken's "Gallery"

Http://kmiller.net-artworks.com/Ken/home.htm
Ken Miller
kmiller@psu.edu
E-Mail>> Ken Miller